Campaign 2010

Jul 25, 2014

The Real Barbara Comstock

An explosive story in Politico revealed Barbara Comstock’s past as a hyper-partisan operative who engaged in exactly the sort of dysfunctional politics that Virginians hate about Washington – but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Comstock has only continued to push a right-wing agenda that is out of touch with Virginia’s values, and her latest target is the healthcare choices of  Northern Virginia women and families.

“Barbara Comstock’s latest obsession is attacking women’s healthcare: pushing to overturn Roe v. Wade, requiring women to undergo unnecessary transvaginal ultra-sounds and even voting to limit common forms of birth control,” said Emily Bittner of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. “Comstock’s right-wing agenda may fit in with the Republican Congress, but it’s just as out of touch with Northern Virginia’s values as her political witch-hunts were.”

Comstock voted to require women to undergo medically unnecessary and invasive transvaginal ultra-sounds, voted  to limit common forms of birth control, and even supports overturning Roe v. Wade making all abortions illegal. Northern Virginia women leaders have condemned Comstock as the “standard bearer for those divisive social issues.”

BACKGROUND:

Comstock: “Yes, I think Roe v Wade Should be Overturned.” In October 2006 on MSNBC’s “Hardball with Chris Matthews,” Comstock said, “…yes, I think Roe vs. Wade should be overturned and the states should decide it.” [MSNBC, 10/16/08] 

Comstock Voted to Require Transvaginal Ultrasounds Prior to Abortions. In 2012, Comstock voted for a bill “that requires women to have a ‘transvaginal ultrasound’ before undergoing abortions.” [HB 462, 2/14/12; Associated Press, 2/15/12]

Comstock Voted To Put Restrictions On Common Forms of Birth Control. In February 2012, Comstock voted in favor of HB 1, a so-called personhood bill, over strong opposition to the bill. Opponents argued that the broad measure could prohibit birth control. The bill passed 66 to 32 in the Virginia House of Delegates. [Washington Post, 2/13/12; HB 1, 2012 Session, 2/14/12]